Six new reports on European Union by the Istituto Affari Internazionali, (IAI) July-September 2014

Edited by Nathalie Tocci, Imagining Europe: Towards a More United and Effective EU,  (IAI Research Papers No. 15) June 2014, pages 220
As the unprecedented economic and political crises push Europe to the brink, a critical question arises as to what the foreseeable trajectories affecting EU governance and policy are in the decades ahead. This volume delineates what model of governance the EU could head towards, and which of these models is best suited for the purpose of a more united and effective Union. More information http://www.iai.it/content.asp?langid=2&contentid=1138

Theodora Kostakopoulou, Mobility, Citizenship and Migration in a Post-Crisis Europe,  (Imagining Europe No. 9) June 2014, pages 26
The economic crisis in Europe post-2008 provided a fertile ground for the re-assertion of national particularism and for the dissemination of discourses questioning not only the idea of free movement of persons but the whole European project per se. Accordingly, the present institutional reality in the European Union is still characterised by two opposed halves: the institutional one that continues to advance free mobility and to promote associated life in the EU and enhanced rights protection for EU citizens, and the re-assertion of state power and neo-nationalism. The latter calls for a “palingenesis,” that is, for renegotiated arrangements. However, the advocated palingenesis carries the risk of the destruction of the foundations of the European project. This paper discuss both dimensions of the institutional reality of citizenship and intra-EU mobility and their connections with integration and migration. More information http://www.iai.it/content.asp?langid=2&contentid=1136

M.Guibernau, Catalan Secessionism: Young People’s Expectations and Political Change, (The International Spectator Volume 49, Issue 3, 2014) August 2014, pages 106-117
The September 2014 referendum is a milestone in Scotland’s history. After 307 years of union with England and a 15-year experience with devolution, Scottish nationalism is within reach of its ultimate goal. Independence would be consensual and Scotland and the rest of the UK would retain multiple links. The EU dimension looms large in the debate and is entangled with the UK’s own review of its membership. Scotland’s referendum is part of a wider trend seeing other ‘stateless nations’ in the democratic world pursuing independence. Even if opinion polls indicate voters will likely reject secession, Scotland’s experience holds important lessons for the wider world. More information http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03932729.2014.952955#.VCRfXnkcQ5g

Claudia Cencetti, Cybersecurity: Unione europea e Italia. Prospettive a confronto (Quaderni IAI No. 12) August 2014, pages 138
Information and communications technologies (ICT) are central to the key functions of modern society, representing the most important component of infrastructure. However, the increase in opportunities provided by ICT are paralleled by greater vulnerability. This volume addresses the question of cybersecurity, the new and growing need for security for economic and social development, by analyzing the initiatives undertaken in this field at the European Union level and in Italy. The EU and Italy are acquiring the minimum technical and normative instruments needed to manage cybersecurity: the EU by providing the guidelines for national initiatives, and Italy on the basis of the National Strategic Framework for Cyberspace Security and the relative National Plan for Cyberspace Protection and ICT Security.
More information http://www.iai.it/content.asp?langid=2&contentid=1160

P.Dardanelli and J.Mitchell, An Independent Scotland? The Scottish National Party’s Bid for Independence and its Prospects (The International Spectator Volume 49, Issue 3, 2014) August 2014, pages 88-105
The September 2014 referendum is a milestone in Scotland’s history. After 307 years of union with England and a 15-year experience with devolution, Scottish nationalism is within reach of its ultimate goal. Independence would be consensual and Scotland and the rest of the UK would retain multiple links. The EU dimension looms large in the debate and is entangled with the UK’s own review of its membership. Scotland’s referendum is part of a wider trend seeing other ‘stateless nations’ in the democratic world pursuing independence. Even if opinion polls indicate voters will likely reject secession, Scotland’s experience holds important lessons for the wider world. More information http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03932729.2014.935996#.VCRej3kcQ5g

Dimitar Bechev, Can the EU Clean Politics in Enlargement Countries? Turkey in Comparison (GTE Commentary No. 14) September 2014, pages 2
The fight against corruption is yet another fine example of the mismatch between EU expectations and capabilities. On the one hand, many regard the Union as capable of overhauling bad habits in member states and, to an even greater degree, in countries that have embarked on the accession journey. On the other, it is important to understand that the rule of law is a precondition rather than a “deliverable”. This commentary looks at the “lessons learned” from the EU’s experiences in Bulgaria and Romania while reflecting on their meaning for Turkey’s accession process and the Union’s ability to bring about significant reforms in Turkey’s domestic setting. More information http://www.iai.it/content.asp?langid=2&contentid=1170