Introducing a TEPSA Member Institute: the Institute of International and European Affairs (IIEA), Ireland

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The Institute of International and European Affairs (IIEA) was founded in 1991 and is Ireland’s leading think tank on European and international affairs. Its extensive research programme aims to provide IIEA members with high-level analysis and forecasts of the challenges on the global and EU policy agendas. It acts as a catalyst for new thinking, new solutions and policy options.

The IIEA provides a forum for dialogue between its members on EU and international developments and their implications for Ireland and Europe. The aim of the IIEA is to evaluate and foster debate on strategic policy options, to exchange views across sectoral, occupational and professional boundaries, and so to add a new dimension to the development of national policy.

The IIEA directs its information and analysis towards policymakers in government, business, industry, the civil service, the diplomatic corps, the legal professions, social and voluntary organisations, trade unions, the media and academia.

The research work of the IIEA is organised in thematic working groups. Flagship groups include: the Future of Europe; Economics and Finance; Digital Future; Justice and Home Affairs; Energy and Environment; Foreign, Security and Defence Policy; Wider Europe; and country specific groups on China, France, Germany, the UK and the US. The groups meet frequently and generate a wide range of publications including reports, books, occasional papers, newsletters, briefing notes, and pamphlets, all of which are made available online.

The IIEA holds more than 100 events per year at which thought leaders outline their vision of key issues that affect European citizens. This extensive programme of events includes keynote addresses, conferences, seminars, confidential briefings, and roundtable discussions. Recent speakers at the IIEA include Ban-Ki Moon, UN Secretary General; Herman Van Rompuy, European Council President; Steven Chu, US Secretary of Energy, and Sharon Bowles, Chair of the European Parliament’s ECON Committee.

In addition to its high-calibre events schedule, the IIEA has an innovative website (www.iiea.com) combining video and audio recordings of events with blogs, publications, infographics, animations, and short video interviews. It has users across all EU member states.

In addition to the work programme undertaken in Ireland, the IIEA has an active branch in Brussels which acts as a network for Irish professionals and policy-makers in the EU and which develops its own initiatives.

As Ireland prepares to assume to Presidency of the Council of the EU on 1 January 2013, the IIEA recently hosted a Pre-Presidency Conference in Dublin Castle, in conjunction with TEPSA, on 23 November 2012. Attended by over 400 delegates, and including four Senior Government Ministers amongst speakers, the conference focussed on Ireland’s Presidency Priorities, The Future of the Union, The Digital/Energy Interface, Economic Governance and EMU and EU Foreign Policy.

For information on the Conference, together with recordings of presentations, click here

For more information on the IIEA’s activities, please visit the IIEA’s website

Recommendations from members of the TEPSA network to the incoming Slovak Presidency, May 2016

tepsahighThe Trans European Policy Studies Association (TEPSA) has the tradition to formulate recommendations to the incoming Council Presidency. These recommendations have been prepared by the following members of the TEPSA network: Iain Begg (TEPSA Board, LSE, London), Katrin Böttger (TEPSA Board, IEP, Berlin), Ilvija Bruģe (LIIA, Riga), Atilla Eralp (CES-METU, Ankara), Diāna Potjomkina (LIIA, Riga), Mark Rhinard (UI, Stockholm), Funda Tekin (CIFE, Berlin) and Guido Tiemann (IHS, Vienna). They do not necessarily represent the view of TEPSA or its member institutes.

Pre-Presidency 2016 BratislavaFunda Tekin presented the recommendations to the incoming Slovak Presidency at the occasion of the TEPSA-IESIR Pre-Presidency Conference on 2 and 3 June 2016 in Bratislava. The conference was organised by the Institute of European Studies and International Relations (IESIR), Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava in cooperation with the Trans European Policy Studies Association (TEPSA), and with the support of the Slovak Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the PONT project.

Migration Crisis

TEPSA has urged previous EU presidencies to devise truly collective solutions to the migration crisis. This should be done out of principle as well as common sense – even the most self-interested, rationalist analysis shows that strengthened management of the EU’s common border, distribution of resources to assist with an orderly asylum process at overwhelmed entry points, and greater shared responsibility for hosting refugees will help to end the crisis. Yet state-centric solutions are on the rise, as the Visegrad Four’s refusal to accept refugee relocation and Hungary’s highly restrictive asylum criteria serve to illustrate. To make matters worse, the European Commission seems content to accept these individualistic solutions. The Commission’s proposals on migration reform, from both April and May of this year, allow for harsh treatment of asylum seekers at the external border in exchange for reinstating Schengen (reopening internal borders). TEPSA urges the Slovakian Presidency of the EU to resist this ‘deal with the devil’ and encourage member states to see beyond their short-term impulses in exchange for long-term, collective solutions.

EU-Turkey relations

Slovakia takes over the EU Presidency at a time when EU-Turkey relations are strained, but more vital than ever, not least because of the refugee crisis. The EU has re-discovered Turkey as a “key strategic partner” and restarted accession negotiations and the visa liberalization procedure with Turkey as well as strengthened institutional EU-Turkey relations through biannual EU-Turkey Summits and regular meetings at the highest levels. At the same time there has been backsliding in Turkey’s reform process vis-à-vis the Copenhagen criteria, while the authoritarian drift in Turkey’s political system continues unabated, with power increasingly in the hands of President Erdoğan.

We urge the Slovak Presidency to keep up the close and balanced dialogue and relations with Turkey. At the same time the EU Presidency should not turn a blind eye Turkish breaches of European values. Specifically we believe the Slovak Presidency can play a key role by:

  • Pushing for the EU to take a clear stance on EU-Turkey relations as well as calling on Turkey to accept and act according to the respective conditions and rules. The visa liberalization procedure, for example, should only be finalized if Turkey implements the reforms linked to the procedure including the anti-terror law.
  • Provide external incentives for internal reforms: the next chapters of accession negotiations that should be opened – if any – are Chapters 23 and 24.
  • Ensure full implementation of the EU-Turkey Deal: although contested, the EU-Turkey Deal has caused a decrease in migration to the Greek islands. This deal needs full commitment on both sides. Inside the EU, the Slovak Presidency would provide a strong signal by committing to the resettlement programme as part of the EU-Turkey Deal, because a fair burden-sharing among EU Member States is essential for its success. At the same time “outsourcing” of migration management should not be the EU’s sole strategy: the Slovak presidency needs to ensure that financial and structural support to Greece continues.
Populism

In the last decade, increasingly euro-sceptical populism – mainly, but not only, right-wing – has been evident in most member states of the European Union. Populist notions are particularly effective in political domains which are inherently complicated, driven by symbolic politics, and characterised by low levels of public information on many key facets of European integration.

TEPSA calls on the incoming Slovak presidency to recognise, and respond to, three major drivers of populist euro-scepticism:

  • Policy gridlock within and among EU institutions;
  • A lack of popular support and legitimacy;
  • The democratic deficit of the European Union.

We urge the Slovak Presidency to counter the growing negativity by shifting the discourse from one that portrays so many common policies as a zero-sum game played among the member states, to one that emphasises the positive-sum outcomes from well-conceived policies that benefit all member states.

EU-Russia and EU-Ukraine relations

Given its external border with Ukraine, Slovakia has a strong interest in fostering a coherent and effective EU policy towards Russia. Progress towards a resolution of the Ukraine crisis can be advanced by:

  • Continuing the two-track approach of supporting Ukraine and the other Eastern Partnership countries in their transformation processes while at the same time stabilising and diversifying EU-relations with Russia. A key facet of this that the Slovak Presidency should encourage is a more active EU investment policy in Ukraine, in order to decrease the proportion of Russian capital, especially in strategic industries
  • But also acknowledging that the expression “Minsk II is dead” becomes progressively harder to refute in successive meetings of the Normandy format. Since they appear to achieve little or no progress in their negotiations, the Slovakian council presidency should seek alternative ways to overcome this stalemate. If a clearer path is not found by the end of the Slovak presidency, there is substantial danger of the conflict in eastern Ukraine ossifying.

With regards to the reform processes in Russia and the Eastern Partnership countries, the Slovak Presidency should build on the momentum from the ‘Panama Papers’ to work towards EU insistence on greater financial transparency and accountability in these countries. Such an initiative would help to deter repetition of scenarios witnessed in the case of Moldova, where the seemingly pro-European elite was engaged in large-scale corruption, and would be effective as a type of sanctions against Russian officials violating norms of international security and human rights. In particular, increased attention must be paid to suspicious deals involving EU nationals and EaP and Russian partners, especially regarding laundered funds located in the EU. The reform process should aim to achieve the progressive substitution of post-Soviet business norms by Western business ethics. Concerning EU-Russia relations, Slovakia will have the difficult task of negotiating amongst the EU-member states and their differing stances concerning the future development of these relations. In the spirit of not seeking to ‘punish’ societies for the actions of their governments and promoting closer ties between European and Russian societies there should also be attention to positive incentives. These should include new strategies for engaging Russian civil society through such instruments as massively increased students’ and youth exchanges, academic cooperation and track II dialogues with easier Schengen entry procedures for Russian nationals. These exchange opportunities may be not only bilateral (EU-Russia) but also involve Eastern Partnership countries.

The economy

Although the recent improvement in Eurozone growth is encouraging, the recovery from the crisis remains fragile. It is, therefore, a disappointment that the efforts of successive presidencies to revive the Europe 2020 strategy have been ineffectual. An approach going beyond the worthy but limited ambitions of the European Fund for Strategic Investment – the Juncker Plan – is needed to demonstrate to increasingly sceptical publics that the EU can make a difference. The Slovak Presidency should seize the opportunity to give fresh momentum to the Europe 2020 strategy or a successor strategy, focusing relentlessly on jobs and growth. The EU needs a budget fit for the challenges of today rather than the previous century. After the high-level group on own resources, chaired by Mario Monti, presents its report, it will be incumbent on the Slovak Presidency to ensure that its findings are acted upon and not left on the shelf to gather dust. Specifically a clear timetable with binding deadlines should be set for implementing new own resources.

Click here to dowload the PDF version of TEPSA’s recommendations

Past events at the Latvian Institute of International Affairs (LIIA) – Winter 2014/15

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Public discussion on “Latvian Foreign, Security and External Economic Policy in 2014-2015: Review and a Look Forward”
20 January 2015, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs (LIIA), Riga

On 20 January, two days before the annual foreign policy debates in the Latvian Parliament, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs with the support of Friedrich Ebert Stiftung organized a public discussion “Latvian Foreign, Security and External Economic Policy in 2014-2015: Review and a Look Forward”. It featured Andris Sprūds (LIIA) as the moderator; an address by Werner Rechmann (FES); a comment by Jānis Kažociņš (MFA / MoD); and Kārlis Bukovskis, Diāna Potjomkina and Viljar Veebel (LIIA) as speakers. The event gave an overview of Latvia’s foreign policy in 2014 and an independent outlook for the year 2015. During the discussion, the latest LIIA publications – “Latvian Foreign and Security Policy Yearbook 2015” and “Economic Diplomacy of the Baltic States” – were also presented.

Here you can find more information and the video of the conference.

http://liia.lv/en/news/jan-20-latvian-foreign-security-and-external-econo/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qsvLG83m1g

Latvian EU Pre-Presidency Conference “Moving the Union Forward: Involvement, Growth, Sustainability”
4 December 2014, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs (LIIA)

On 4 December, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs with crucial support from its partners organized the Latvian EU Pre-Presidency Conference “Moving the Union Forward: Involvement, Growth, Sustainability”. It was one of the first official presidency events. The topics of the conference included EU’s social and economic developments, EU’s role in the world, relations with the Eastern Partnership countries and the Central Asia region, as well as energy policy and the Single Digital Market. The conference brought together more than 40 prominent EU researchers and experts and approx. 120 listeners.

The conference was made possible by the partners – TEPSA and THESEUS – and by the organizations that provided essential support, namely the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, the European Commission representation in Latvia, the European Parliament Information Office in Latvia, and the Latvian EU Presidency.

The Final Report of the Conference is available here.

Additional resources:
Traditional TEPSA Recommendations were presented at the event, which together with the Background Paper on the Latvian Presidency are available here.
The programme of the conference is available here.
The address by Valdis Dombrovskis is available here.

Videos:
Opening and the First Panel “Citizens’s Concerns in a Stronger EU”
Second Panel “Towards the Common Voice in the International Arena”
Third Panel “Towards the Riga Summit: Eastern Partnership as a Community of Values or Interests?”

TEPSA Pre-Presidency Conference and General Assembly, 4-5 July 2013, Vilnius

DSC_0010The TEPSA Lithuanian Pre-Presidency conference was held on July 4th, 2013 in Vilnius. The next day the General Assembly gathering the TEPSA Members took place.

The Conference concentrated on the main priorities of Lithuanian EU Presidency covering the EU Eastern Partnership Policy, the common energy policy, European economic governance reforms and challenges of differentiation in the EU. Participants from Lithuanian governmental institutions and TEPSA institutions from all over Europe took part. Recommendations to the Lithuanian Presidency were presented.

The event featured the interventions of Her Excellency Dalia Grybauskaitė, President of Lithuania and Linas Linkevičius, Minister for Foreign Affairs.DSC_0040

The Conference was organized by Trans European Policy Studies Association (TEPSA), Institute of International Relations and Political Science of Vilnius University (IIRPS VU) and European Integration Studies Center (Vilnius). It was financed by the Representation of European Commission and the Bureau of European Parliament in Lithuania.

Please click here to read the TEPSA Pre-Presidency Conference Vilnius report and the Programme.

Pre-Presidency Conference in Cyprus: The Cypriot EU Presidency 2012: Institutional consolidation and responding to new challenges, 14-15 June 2012

The Cypriot Pre-Presidency Conference took place on 14 and 15 June 2012 at the New Campus of the University of Cyprus in Nicosia. It was organised by KIMEDE (Cyprus Institute of Mediterranean European and International Studies, in cooperation with the Erasmus Academic Network LISBOAN, the Trans European Policy Studies Association (TEPSA), the Cypriot Presidency of the Council of the EU, the European Commission Representation in Cyprus and the University of Cyprus. This conference welcomed a broad audience of local politicians, representatives of the EU institutions and of local organisations but also researchers from EU member states and beyond.

The conference was opened with the TEPSA recommendations to the Cypriot presidency and followed by the presentation of the Priorities to the Cypriot EU Presidency. During the plenary session, TEPSA members took part in a lively discussion on the theme of solidarity: Which kind of solidarity? An analysis of the sharpened debate on the EU in the member states. The workshops have discussed about “The economic and social crisis in the EU”, “Free movement and migration”, “the EU Enlargement Policy” and “the EU’s external relations and diplomacy”. The participants have also tackled the sharpened debate of the solidarity at the European and national level. The Pre-Presidency Conference closed with a Plenary Session on “the reflections on Lisbon innovations and the role of the EU Council”.

Please download the Recommendations to the Cypriot Presidency, Discussion paper on solidarity in the European Union and the Report of the TEPSA Pre-Presidency Conference in Cyprus.

TEPSA Danish Pre-Presidency Conference Report, 8-9 December 2011 and Recommendations to the Danish Presidency

The Danish Pre-Presidency Conference was organised by the Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS) in Copenhagen last 8-9 December.The Opening Plenary Session presented the Priorities of the Danish Presidency and the Presidency Recommendations by TEPSA.

The Conference notably included the following panels: Reform of the Common Agricultural Policy, Differentiated Membership of the EU, The EU budget: a Driver for Growth and Europe 2020?, The Future of the Euro, The EU and the Arab Spring.

Those key issues were presented by members of the Danish government and analyzed by invited speakers and panelists, top officials and scholars from across Europe.

During the Pre-Presidency Conference TEPSA presented the Recommendations to the Danish Presidency.

TEPSA Polish Pre-Presidency Conference 30 June-1 July 2011 and Recommendations to the Polish Presidency

Last Thursday 30 June and Friday 1 July 2011, the College of Europe Natolin (Warsaw) campus hosted the Pre-Presidency Conference on the “Priorities of the Polish presidency of the European Union”. The conference was organized by members of the Trans European Policy Studies Association (TEPSA), the European Institute Łódź and the College of Europe, in cooperation with TEPSA and under the auspices ofthe Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Poland.

The conference concentrated mainly on the priorities of the Polish presidency and the recent and upcoming challenges for the European Union in the following themes: EU Presidency under the Lisbon Treaty, EU security policy, EU neighboorhood policy and economic governance. Those key issues were presented notably by top EU officials Herman VAN ROMPUY, President of the European Council, Jerzy BUZEK, President of the European Parliament, Former Prime Minister of Poland and Janusz LEWANDOWSKI, EU Commissioner for Financial Programming and Budget. Members of the Polish government such as Radosław SIKORSKI, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Jacek ROSTOWSKI, Minister of Finance and scholars from across Europe provided their inputs and exchanged fresh ideas during this fruitful conference.

During the Pre-Presidency Conference TEPSA presented the Recommendations to the Polish Presidency.

TEPSA Pre-Presidency Conference, Brussels 20-21 May 2010

«Future Prospects for the Belgian Presidency of the EU: Global Challenges in a New Institutional Era»

The conference brought together senior scholars and high level practitioners from across Europe to focus on the 2010 Belgian Presidency of the European Union after the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. The Belgian Presidency was analysed in the light of a worried union facing both the recent global challenges such as the recent economic crisis and the various ongoing conflicts at its gates and an internal questioning about its role in a globalised world where compete emerging new powers.

It examined through exchanges between the participants and the 2010 Belgian Presidency both the particular Belgian vision, outputs and prospects for improving European efficiency in the following thematics: Security and Defense, Climate Change and Environment, Immigration and Development, Eastern Dimension and Energy supply, Lisbon Strategy and Economic Social Cohesion and finally the External Representation of the European Union.

The Conference was organised by the EGE Network in cooperation with TEPSA and Egmont – Royal Institute for International Relations, with the support of the Belgian Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

Recommendations from TEPSA to the Belgian Presidency are available here.

TEPSA Belgian Pre-Presidency Conference, 20-21 May 2010, Brussels

«Future Prospects for the Belgian Presidency of the EU: Global Challenges in a New Institutional Era»

The conference brought together senior scholars and high level practitioners from across Europe to focus on the 2010 Belgian Presidency of the European Union after the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. The Belgian Presidency analysed in the light of a worried union facing both the recent global challenges such as the recent economic crisis and the various ongoing conflicts at its gates and an internal questioning about its role in a globalised world where compete emerging new powers.

It examined through exchanges between the participants and the 2010 Belgian Presidency both the particular Belgian vision, outputs and prospects for improving European efficiency in the following thematics: Security and Defense, Climate Change and Environment, Immigration and Development, Eastern Dimension and Energy supply, Lisbon Strategy and Economic Social Cohesion and finally the External Representation of the European Union.

The Conference was organised by the EGE Network in cooperation with TEPSA and Egmont – Royal Institute for International Relations, with the support of the Belgian Presidency of the Council of the European Union.

Please click here to view the conference programme; click here to dowload the conference report and click here to read the full speech of Prof. Christian Franck on the previous Belgian Presidencies.

Recommendations to the Spanish Presidency, November 2009

On the occasion of its Pre-Presidency Conference on 24-25 November 2009 at the Spanish Senate, organized by TEPSA’s Spanish member Elcano, again recommendations to the Spanish Presidency were presented. These were elaborated by Michele Comelli (IAI, Rome), Gunilla Herolf (SIPRI, Stockholm), Visnja Samardzija (IMO, Zagreb), Krisztina Vida (IWE, Budapest) and Jaap de Zwaan (Clingendael, The Hague).

Recommendations to the Spanish Presidency can be found here.

TEPSA EU-CONSENT Pre-Presidency Conference on the occasion of the launching of the Swedish Presidency of the European Union, 28-29 May 2009, Stockholm

The Swedish TEPSA EU-CONSENT Pre-Presidency Conference took place on 28 and 29 May 2009 at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs (SIIA) in Stockholm. The conference was organised by TEPSA’s Swedish Member Institute, the SIIA, and the Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies (SIEPS) and the Stockholm Forum for Security Studies (SFSS).

Entitled “Swedish Presidency 2009: Finding Solidarity in the Face of Crises” the conference brought together senior scholars and high-level practitioners from across Europe to discuss the key topics of the Swedish Presidency of the EU. It examined the prospects for improving European solidarity in the face of existing and emerging challenges.

The conference started on 28 May 2009 with introductory speeches by Jean Victor Louis, Acting Secretary General of TEPSA, Tomas Ries, Director of the SIIA and Anna Stellinger, Director of SIEPS. In the following key note speeches Cecilia Malmström, Swedish Minister for EU Affairs and Margot Wallström, Vice President of the European Commission, shared their reflections on the upcoming Swedish Presidency. They stressed the Swedish Presidency’s plans to overcome the economic downturn in Europe, to succeed in the negotiations on a Post-Kyoto climate agreement in Copenhagen and to manage the EU’s institutional challenges. Finally, as a long tradition in offering recommendations to future Presidencies, Petr Kratochvil from the Institute of International Relations, Prague, presented recommendations from TEPSA members to the Swedish EU Presidency.

In the afternoon 6 parallel workshops discussed the following subjects:

• ESDP at 10 Years: the EU and International Security

• The EU’s Neighbourhood and Eastern Partnership

• Climate Change and the Environment

• A New Era in Transatlantic Relations?

• The Baltic Sea Strategy: A Test Case for Solidarity

• Societal Security and the Stockholm Programme

The first conference day ended with a reception at the SIIA and a dinner at which Hanna Ojanen, Programme Director of the Finish Institute of International Affairs and TEPSA Board member, awarded the TEPSA Training Programme participants their certificates for successfully completing a training course on providing policy advice to policy makers, improving communication skills, and EU funding and project management.

The second day of the conference on 29 May 2009 started with two plenary panels. On the first panel entitled “EU Institutions in Flux: Elections, Appointments, and Lisbon”, chaired by Graham Avery, Honorary Director General, European Commission, academics from TEPSA’s member institutes (Jean Victor Louis, TEPSA, Jaap de Zwaan, Netherlands Institute for International Relations, Clingendael, Mark Rhinard, SIIA) and Neill Nugent, Manchester Metropolitan University discussed their views on current EU institutional issues with Hervé Jouanjean, Deputy Secretary General, European Commission. On the following panel on “Economic Crisis and European Solidarity”, chaired by Anna Michalski, SIEPS, Bo Lundgren, Director General of Swedish National Debt Office, discussed the economic crisis with Lars Heikensten, Swedish Member of European Court of Auditors, Iain Begg, London School of Economics and Krisztina Vida, Institute of World Economics, Budapest.

During the lunch break the TEPSA Training participants posted the key points of discussion from their role as rapporteur during the parallel workshops of the first day. In the Presidency Panel entitled “Managing the EU Presidency: Finding Success and Avoiding Failure” chaired by Rolf Gustavsson, Brussels Correspondent, Svenska Dagbladet Newspaper, the speakers Gilles Briatta, Advisor of EU Affairs to Prime Minister Fillon and Secretary-General of European Affairs, France and Milena Vicenová, Permanent Representative to the EU in Brussels, Czech Republic shared their Presidency experiences and advices with Gustaf Lind, State Secretary, Prime Minister´s Office, Sweden and Enrique Viguera Rubio, Ambassador and former Director-General for EU Coordination at the Foreign Ministry, Spain.

The conference ended with closing remarks from Wolfgang Wessels, TEPSA/University of Cologne, who emphasized the importance of scientists and research to give policy advice, the need for European leadership and the role Presidencies can play in the management of EU power struggles. Worried about the lack of politicization of the European elections he furthermore stressed the need for a framework in case the Lisbon Treaty fails.

After the Pre-Presidency Conference TEPSA’s General Assembly gathered representatives of TEPSA member institutes to discuss internal matters.



Past events at the Latvian Institute of International Affairs (LIIA) – Autumn 2014

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Latvian EU Pre-Presidency Conference on “Moving the Union Forward: Involvement, Growth, Sustainability”
4-5 December 2014, Latvian Institute of International Affairs (LIIA), Riga

On 4-5 December 2014, LIIA organized the conference “Moving the Union Forward: Involvement, Growth, Sustainability” in cooperation with the Trans European Policy Studies Association (TEPSA) and the THESEUS Project, with generous support of the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung and the European Commission Representation in Latvia. This has been recognized as an official event of the Latvian EU Presidency and is also supported by the Presidency. Please find the provisional programme here.

Semi-formal debate on “From the Baltic Revolution to the Cultural Capital of Europe: An American Reflects on Returning to Riga”
24 November 2014, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs (LIIA), Riga

On November 24 at 17.00, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs hosted a debate “From the Baltic Revolution to the Cultural Capital of Europe: An American Reflects on Returning to Riga”, featuring Douglas Wake. Douglas Wake is a former American diplomat, international civil servant and educator with extensive experience in Latvia and neighboring countries including Russia and much of Europe and Eurasia. He has been visiting Riga periodically since 1988 and served at the American Embassy on Raina Bulvaris from 1994 to 1997. Doug is now spending three months as a Visiting Fellow at the Latvian Institute of International Affairs here in Riga. He shared his personal impressions of some regional security, political and economic developments in Latvia and the broader region over the past quarter century; he looked forward to an exchange of views about current challenges and prospects for Latvia’s future in a dynamic international environment.  

International discussion on “Energy (In)Security: Ways Forward for the Europe and the Baltic States”
13 November 2014, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs (LIIA), Riga

On November 13 at 15:00, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs in cooperation with the Centre for Geopolitical Studies (Lithuania) organized a public discussion “Ways Forward for the Baltic / European Energy Security”. The escalating Ukrainian crisis has moved European energy security higher up on the agenda, and for Latvia, its upcoming EU presidency adds extra importance to this traditionally topical issue. This event aimed at providing the latest information and analysis about energy security in Latvia, Baltic Sea Region and the European Union, as well as discussing different alternatives for further action, including the brand new Connecting Europe Facility, cooperation with the US et cetera. Particular attention was paid to the gas policies. The debate featured Krišjānis Kariņš (Member of the European Parliament, Latvia), Alan Riley (Professor of Law at City Law School, specializing in energy law, United Kingdom), Ruben Vermeeren (Policy Officer, European Commission, DG ENERGY), Mikhail Krutikhin (Partner, RusEnergy, Russia) and Juozas Augutis (Energy Security Research Centre, Lithuania). Web stream available here.

Read more.

Debate on “Debriefing the Wales NATO Summit: Way Forward for NATO’s Eurasian Partnerships”, 8 September 2014, the Latvian Institute of International Affairs (LIIA), Riga

On 8 September, LIIA hosted the debate “Debriefing the Wales NATO Summit: Way Forward for NATO’s Eurasian Partnerships”, with the support of NATO. It was dedicated to the results of the Wales NATO summit, with a particular focus on the Alliance’s Eurasian partnerships (Ukraine, Moldova, Russia, Baltic Sea Region, etc.). Andris Spruds (Director, LIIA), Edgars Rinkevics (Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Latvia) and Janis Sarts (State Secretary, Ministry of Defence of Latvia) delivered introductory remarks. Panel speakers included Guna Snore (Program Officer, NATO Public Diplomacy Division), Eka Tkeshelashvili (President, Georgian Institute for Strategic Studies), Leonid Polyakov (Senior Fellow, Institute for Strategic Studies “New Ukraine”; former Deputy Minister of Defence, Ukraine), Sergey Oznobishchev (Director, Institute for Strategic Assessments, Russia), Robert Nurick (Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council of the United States, the US; Visiting Senior Fellow, Finnish Institute of International Affairs) and Doug Wake (Visiting Fellow, LIIA, the USA).
Check the conference video and photos.

TEPSA Brief: Recommendations to the Swedish Presidency – June 2009

The Swedish Pre-Presidency Conference took place on 28 and 29 May 2009 at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs (SIIA) in Stockholm. The conference was organised by TEPSA’s Swedish Member Institute, the SIIA, and the Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies (SIEPS) in cooperation with TEPSA and the EU-CONSENT network and Stockholm Forum for Security Studies (SFSS).

Entitled “Swedish Presidency 2009: Finding Solidarity in the Face of Crises” the conference brought together senior scholars and high-level practitioners from across Europe to focus on the Swedish Presidency of the EU. It examined the prospects for improving European solidarity in the face of existing and emerging challenges.

 

During the conference, Petr Kratochvil has presented the Recommendations to the Swedish Presidency to Cecilia Malmström, Minister for EU Affairs.

 

These recommendations to the Swedish Presidency of the European Union were drafted by Brendan Donnelly (The Federal Trust for Education and Research), Hanna Ojanen (The Finnish Institute of International Affairs) and Petr Kratochvíl (The Institute of International Relations, Prague).